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Coonoor, Tamil Nadu 643101 India

News & Insights

News & Insights

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Insights

Putting the “Service” in Information Services

There is often a tendency for the folks who build and run information services to adopt a “set it and forget it” approach. These services are tough to build and once they are up and running it’s easy to sit back and focus on renewal marketing. This is a mistake.

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HCOMP 2016

Information Evolution is proud to sponsor HCOMP 2016, the world’s premier event for unveiling the latest research on crowdsourcing and human computation. The HCOMP conference, run by the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, is hosted at the University of Texas School of Information this year and will take

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Supporting Academic Innovation

Information Evolution has been a proud donor to the University of Texas School of Information, once their “library school,” for the past four years. We’d like everyone reading this post to consider joining us in supporting their own local graduate schools of information. Here’s why… Graduate schools of information and

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Dumpster Diving for Data

CRM databases are full of bad, old data. The garbage continues to accrue over time getting worse as new files from purchased lists are added, acquired firms’ CRM files are merged, and salespeople keep adding their Rolodexes while no existing records are ever removed. For this reason salespeople at most

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Cloud Labor

Many businesspeople fear that crowdsourcing – or cloud labor – poses a threat to US jobs and thus our economy. In fact, the opposite is true. Using crowdsourcing to take care of time-consuming research, data collection, and other simple tasks frees skilled employees to focus on higher-value work, increasing employers’

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URLs v. DUNS

When businesses began to use their corporate web sites for more than just “brochure-ware,” they opened up a world of opportunities to streamline communications with customers, employees, investors, and suppliers. Corporate web sites today can include RFP tender portals, product spec and pricing databases, and customer service portals with real-time

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Disintermediation: Part 2

In Part 1 of this post I discussed the possibility of content aggregators becoming less viable as the corporate and government owners of large valuable datasets start making their data available directly, free-of-charge, and/or via new cooperative aggregation models. In Part 2 I look at the rise of corporate content.

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Disintermediation: Part 1

When the Worldwide Web was born in the 1990s, there was a lot of talk about disintermediation. The removal of layers of intermediaries—middlemen, that is—in marketplaces and other commercial processes would lead to fewer handoffs and price mark-ups. The resulting efficiencies would redound to the all-important end-users, making their lives

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Features v. Intent

by Matt Manning For the information industry, the question of customers’ return on investment in data subscriptions and licenses is an existential one: without a clear ROI, renewal rates go down and information services wither away (see The Importance of Being Used). A corollary to being able to My earned

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Labor as a Service

One of the most underappreciated aspects of the rise of crowdsourcing is that it’s laying the groundwork for a fundamental change in the very nature of work. The construct of the M-F, 9am-5pm, on-site, day job is now only marginally workable. Employers find it more difficult to get demonstrable ROI

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